News Bits

by Luke Muehlhauser on November 27, 2011 in News

I made a dedicated discussion page for Facing the Intelligence Explosion.

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{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

Zeb November 27, 2011 at 8:31 pm

Will the FtS posts be cross posted here? I would appreciate that, but subscribing to two more sites is not too much trouble either.

I suspect hosting the discussion on LW will shake off some participants who simply may not want to have to go off site to comment, and some who will not appreciate the welcome their comments may receive there. Personally I will be less likely to comment than if the site had its own comments or if the posts were also posted here. I would suggest adding the discussion link to the bottom banner because few will find it on the about page, unless you don’t really want the general readers to try to discuss but rather just want feedback from other LWers.

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Luke Muehlhauser November 28, 2011 at 12:34 am

FtS posts will not be cross-posted.

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Alexander Kruel November 28, 2011 at 1:53 am

They *start off* by biting into fluorescent light bulbs and it just gets more nuts from there.

I hope those were fake.

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Howard December 1, 2011 at 7:26 pm

“Personal trainer starts eating like an American, gains 70 pounds. Will return to sane diet and lose it all.”

Maybe. We’ll see.

The main cause of excess weight gain is mitochondrial damage caused by trans-fat, gluten, gliadin, lectins, and fructose. The half-life of the repair process is on the order of a decade, during which time you can’t lose weight (or even maintain HWP) without conscious and continuous dietary restriction.

So, we’ll wait and see. I’m willing to predict that losing 70 lbs is going to be a bit tougher than he anticipates. And I’m predicting that he will have a continuing weight problem for several decades.

I’ve been there, done that. Only I got to about 150 lbs overweight. I’ve lost about 100 of that, but the last 50 is a bitch.

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joseph December 8, 2011 at 7:06 pm

@Howard
Do you have more information on this? I thought Mitochrondrial reproduce either with the cell or in response to higher energy demand, I’ve also seen some information saying that mitochrondrial fusion as a repair mechanism and that dysfunctional mitochrondria can be removed by lysosomes. Do mitochrondria lack self repair mechanisms, has this job been taken on by the host cell?
Also I thought fructose was part of the krebs cycle, do you mean an excessively high amount?
Thanks for your time.

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joseph December 8, 2011 at 7:32 pm

Hang on,
Got the fructose bit wrong on 2 counts:
1/Meant glucolysis, not the krebs.
2/ the fructose from glucose has the phosphate group attached to a different carbon than the phosphorylated fructose from fructose

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Howard December 9, 2011 at 5:18 pm

@Howard Do you have more information on this? I thought Mitochrondrial reproduce either with the cell or in response to higher energy demand, I’ve also seen some information saying that mitochrondrial fusion as a repair mechanism and that dysfunctional mitochrondria can be removed by lysosomes.

Mitochondria can be replaced, and new mitochondria are built with the addition of lean muscle tissue. The damage done by trans-fat, however, is subtle, and does not render the mitochondria completely useless, just impairs the ability to process lipids. Weight training is fabulous for getting new mitochondria — and dramatically improves the body’s response to a low-carb diet (as Ornish ‘proved’, exercise will offset some, but not all, of the damage done by his obscenely unhealthy almost-zero-fat diet). Unfortunately, as you age, the ability to add new muscle decreases, and eventually stops, and the best you can do at that point is to avoid losing what you already have. So, the ‘half-life’ of the repair process increases with age.

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joseph December 10, 2011 at 1:50 am

Interesting,
I found this, in support:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/6737083/

But I also found some papers indicating mitochondrial oxidative capacity is unchanged in skeletal muscle.
What I’m wondering is why would the mitochondria be damaged for a period of about 7 years, I’d guess that would make the half life of whatever causes the damage, or is damaged, about 1.4 years (if you say 5 half lives is a cut of point), so I’m wondering what that is? Of course my reasoning could be faulty, and I’m equally willing to be corrected if so. Thankyou.

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joseph December 10, 2011 at 1:53 am

Oh Gods! Sorry, no, we said half life of 10 years! Ok, same question, bigger numbers!

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Howard December 10, 2011 at 4:09 am

I had read somewhere it was “on the order of” a decade, but don’t remember where. May have been in the comments on the HyperLipid blog. Here’s one of Petro Dobromylskyj’s posts: http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2011/11/metabolic-flexibility-and-identical.html — Petro (Peter) is a fairly tough read, but worth the effort. I’ve been following his blog for about a year now.

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