Atheistic Art

by Luke Muehlhauser on May 11, 2010 in Funny,General Atheism

There is tons of art out there that depicts religion in a bad light, or freethought in a good light. Here are just a few of the most explicit ones:

ghostbusters_jesus

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"Study after Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X" by Francis Bacon

"Study after Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X" by Francis Bacon

fsm inkblot

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no cross

Can you spot the hidden word?

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(click for full size)

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mohammed bomb

atheism symbolghostbusters jesus 2

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{ 12 comments… read them below or add one }

Bill Maher May 11, 2010 at 6:33 am

Bill Murray > Jesus.

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Molly May 11, 2010 at 8:08 am

I loooooove Francis Bacon, one of my favorite painters of all time!

This piece by Andres Serrano called, “Piss Christ,” is infamous in the contemporary art world for its blasphemy. It’s a beautiful photograph and a comment on the bizarre obsession with Jesus’ body and bodily fluids(blood) in Christianity:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piss_Christ

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Molly May 11, 2010 at 8:22 am

Of course, Serrano’s photograph could be interpreted several different ways but I find the obsession with the body and blood (in terms of “eating and drinking” it) very peculiar. It can also be considered as a representation of the way Christians exploit the death of Christ for their own benefit. But, I guess they kind of have to because it is the very foundation on which their system of faith is built.

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Smart Atheist May 11, 2010 at 8:53 pm

Hey, this is actually a good topic. Why is it that Christian art, at least in the form of literature, is so much more profound and enduring than its secular counterpart? Compare, for instance, Dostoevksy, Dante, and Hugo, to Graham Greene, Bukowski, and Vonnegut. And perhaps in painting we could say the same: Oh Atheism: where is your Michelangelo?

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Smart Atheist May 11, 2010 at 9:03 pm

Or Again, in Music: Compare Rachmaninov’s Vespers to Lady Gaga’s Poker Face. Only a philistine would choose the latter.

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Sly May 11, 2010 at 9:08 pm

Or Again, in Music: Compare Rachmaninov’s Vespers to Lady Gaga’s Poker Face. Only a philistine would choose the latter.

This two are totally comparable… *eyes roll out of head*

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Smart Atheist May 11, 2010 at 9:20 pm

‘This two are totally comparable… *eyes roll out of head*”

That’s the point: atheism has no narrative that could compete with the Christian narrative in terms sublimity and profundity.

“Christ crucified: The most sublime symbol still.”

- Nietzsche

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lukeprog May 11, 2010 at 9:43 pm

Even today some of the most accessible composers are writing ‘spiritual’ music: Part, Gorecki, etc.

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Sly May 11, 2010 at 11:13 pm

‘This two are totally comparable… *eyes roll out of head*”That’s the point: atheism has no narrative that could compete with the Christian narrative in terms sublimity and profundity.
“Christ crucified: The most sublime symbol still.”- Nietzsche  

Because poker face is a song about atheism, or even a song that is supposed to be deep….. Oh wait. 0_o

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Lou Doench May 12, 2010 at 4:37 am

@Smart Atheist

Consider, the Christians and other theists have a huge head start on us. Back in Michelangelo’s time, atheism could get you killed! Plus for most of the Common Era, right up until the Enlightenment, the Church was the most powerful economic and political force in Europe. They sponsored massive works of public art. Until quite recently in terms of art history no one created a major piece of artwork outside the auspices of the church.

One of the criterion for being “timeless” is a touch of antiquity. Give us a couple centuries of secular society and then get back to me. ;)

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Justfinethanks May 12, 2010 at 7:36 am

Yes, just think of all those Christian novelists who have a had a more profound mark on American literature than Mark Twain and Hemmingway and Christian painters who have had a more profound mark on 20th century art than Pablo Picasso (a practicing Catholic who labeled himself an atheist) and Jackson Pollock.

/sarc

Also, Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, which rests as a foundational work of literature in English, contains in it prominent themes of religious hypocrisy, greed, and corruption. The idea that atheists and works of anti-religious art have played no role in the development of western art is simply ludicrous.

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sunset November 13, 2010 at 12:24 pm

(Galatians 6: 7:8): “Be not deceived, God is not mocked. For what things a man shall sow, those also shall he reap.

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